David Baker Architects

JOSEPH ESHERICK PROFESSOR

Field of Dreams: UC Berkeley 2013 Fall Graduate Studio


See all Events

 

@StoreFrontLab
City Making Series
 

Field of Dreams: Rising Tides
February Open Hours

 

Stop by to enjoy the design explorations at one of these upcoming at StoreFrontLab Open Hours events. Plus learn about StoreFrontLab's City Making Series Call for Proposals. 

 

Not a Bar, Not Your House
Field of Dreams Open Hours

Friday, February 7, 5-8PM

// Stop by, unwind, see the exhibit 

Free, but please register as space is limited.


Coffee Time
Field of Dreams Open Hours

Saturday, February 15, 1-5PM

// Featuring St. Franks coffee and music from Brandon Loper's "Unwieldy Beast"

Free, but please register as space is limited.

Models at the StoreFrontLab.org gallery space.

SPATIAL ASCENT by Kwangmin Ryu uses three different kinds of architectural gestures: Linkage of green spaces from bottom to top, interaction with negative spaces, and the "tree branch" shape of the structural facade.

INFRASTUCTURE_ICON by Ben Golze.

CROSSOVER by Andy Rastetter. Water and green spaces are woven through the site to create a loosely figured edge condition between Mission Rock Square and the San Francisco Bay.

LIGHT CARVING by Stephen Stewart. Vertical gardens on the south façade create a green connection from the park throughout the building.

COMMONWELL by Elizabeth Kee. Exterior Vignette of Eastern Lightwell and Ground Floor Retail.

CONNECTION by Leo X. Zhao was shaped by a series of cuts to connect people inside and outside of the building both visually and physically.

WIND-WIND by Hsiu Wei Chang. Residents linger in the two-story corridor with sky gardens.

URBAN REFUGE by Ellie Ratcliff brings San Franciscans closer to the city's natural wildlife and integrates public park with residential building. At the ground level, a central courtyard provides a space for farmers markets, food trucks, and social gathering.

FOUR SQUARE by Tajai Massey connects the Terry Francois Boardwalk and Mission Rock Square through an open street-level plan and solar pavilion with unfettered public access. Exterior walkways connect the four thin towers, allowing in air and light and creating spaces for lively interaction between residents.

SLOW RISE by Julie Chau. Occupying an internal ramp, which shifts in spatial condition, creates moments for interaction between inhabitants and becomes an event in itself.

VERTICAL STREET by Fanzheng Dong. Continuing the park in front of the project up the tall building brings outdoor space with fresh air and light up into the vertical street.

Interior, CROSSOVER by D'Genaro Pulido.

Joseph Esherick

"I was appointed to Joseph Esherick Professor of Practice for the Fall 2013. Joe was a mentor during my student days at UC and after. It's a very meaningful honor to serve in his memory." —David Baker

The Field of Dreams

FIELD OF DREAMS:
RISING TIDES
is meant to frame the dual agenda of the studio and characterize unique opportunities in the project.


On the one hand, we have a blank slate, an opportunity to speculate unhindered on a next chapter of making the City—a field of dreams. On the other hand, architecture is circumscribed by current realities, by real and legible environmental challenges—by rising tides.


It is our hope and belief that such polarities can be rich and productive and can help produce architecture of particular clarity and insight.

Prelude

On four separate occasions during the 1980’s and early 1990’s, local voters rejected ballot measures that would publicly finance a new stadium for the San Francisco Giants. As a result, the team owners agreed to sell the Giants to a group that intended to move the team to Florida. Major League Baseball ultimately rejected the deal, and a local ownership group emerged that committed not only to keeping the team in San Francisco, but to building a new downtown stadium.

When the new venue opened in 2000, it was the first major league baseball stadium since 1962 that had been built predominantly with private financing [96%]. Although privately owned, the stadium sits on a 12.5-acre parcel owned by the City, who has provided a 66-year lease. Immediately south of the stadium—across McCovey Cove, China Basin and the Lefty O’Doul Bridge—lies Seawall Lot 337. Along with adjacent Pier 48, this site has recently become know as Mission Rock.

Like the majority of waterfront property spanning from Aquatic Park at the north to Pier 70 at the south, Mission Rock is under the control of the Port of San Francisco. It is currently used as a surface parking lot and special events space [Cirque Du Soleil, etc.]. In 2008 the Port requested proposals for development of the site, with four development teams responding. In January of 2009, the Port announced that a team led by the Giants had been selected to develop the site.

At 27 acres, the site is one of the largest available parcels of land in the City, and according to Mayor Edwin Lee, “Mission Rock will be one of the largest urban mixed use projects in America….” The development is scheduled to break ground in 2015 and will create an entirely new neighborhood at the edge of the city.

Through a complex process that will be further discussed in studio, a master plan has been submitted for environmental review that would provide over a million square feet of residential space, 130,000 square feet of retail space, 8 acres of open space, and 800,000 square feet of commercial/office space targeted towards "innovative companies."

Once complete, the development is expected to provide housing for up to 2,000 people and employment for as many as 7,000. The project has been designated as a Type 1 Eco-District by the San Francisco Planning Department as part of the Sustainable Development Program, focused on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, reducing water consumption and waste, and enhancing community-scale energy resources.

Quick study model for the district at 1"=100'.

Student models fitting into 1"=50' base model at Perkins & Will. Thanks Gerry!

Project

The work in studio used the proposed master plan as a testing ground for what the potential of the site and its architecture might be. There are currently 10 "building sites" within the development, identified as mixed-use buildings composed of retail and commercial at the lower levels with active ground floors, and a mix of residential, office and flex spaces at the levels above. The sites range in area from 17,000-43,000 sf, with maximum heights ranging from between 120 and 380 feet.

Each student will be working on an individual site (David is going to do the parking garage), but our hope and expectation is that there will be a shared vision for the collective work of the studio, emphasizing not only individual projects but the relationship of projects to each other, and to goals that larger than building scale.

David Baker’s office has been involved in early tests of the master plan and is expected to have an ongoing involvement with the project. Other ‘real-world’ participants in the process will join us for reviews and discussions during the semester, although the goals and methodologies of the studio are in no way meant to produce pseudo-professionalism. We expect to challenge some of the precepts of the master plan as much as we expect to learn from them, and a critical stance about both your own work and ideas about the city are an absolute necessity.

Models, renderings, student presentations, and engaged discussion filled the evening @StorefrontLab's first City Making Salon.

Field of Dreams: Rising Tides
A City Making Salon @StorefrontLab

Thursday, January 30
@Storefront Lab
337 Shotwell Street, San Francisco

With waterfront height limits back in the local headlines, Field of Dreams: Rising Tides offers a timely springboard for discussion about bay-front development strategies in San Francisco. 

A Fall 2013 U.C. Berkeley College of Environmental Design graduate studio led by Roddy Creedon of Allied Architecture + Design and David Baker of David Baker Architects (DBA), Field of Dreams: Rising Tides tackled Mission Rock, a 27-acre site along the San Francisco waterfront and one of the largest development parcels available in the city.

The significant site provided students with a platform for unhindered speculation about the future of coastal cities. At the same time, the design proposals were informed by the Mission Rock master plan, currently in environmental review, which served as case study illustrating real-world constraints, ecological challenges and design strategies.

We're moving the academic investigation out of the classroom and into StorefrontLab — a Mission District cultural space supporting experiments of community interest — and adding food, drinks and conviviality. Our moderator, DBA's Amit Price Patel, promises to keep us on our toes. 

 

Joseph Esherick

The Field of Dreams

Quick study model for the district at 1"=100'.

Student models fitting into 1"=50' base model at Perkins & Will. Thanks Gerry!

The mid-term review site model at the end of October.

Ellie and Jullie with the site model taking shape.

2013.12.05 David Fletcher generously stopped by for a studio review.

CONNECTION by Leo X. Zhao was shaped by a series of cuts to connect people inside and outside of the building both visually and physically.

COMMONWELL by Elizabeth Kee. Exterior Vignette of Eastern Lightwell and Ground Floor Retail.

URBAN REFUGE by Ellie Ratcliff brings San Franciscans closer to the city's natural wildlife and integrates public park with residential building. At the ground level, a central courtyard provides a space for farmers markets, food trucks, and social gathering.

FOUR SQUARE by Tajai Massey connects the Terry Francois Boardwalk and Mission Rock Square through an open street-level plan and solar pavilion with unfettered public access.

FOUR SQUARE by Tajai Massey connects the Terry Francois Boardwalk and Mission Rock Square through an open street-level plan and solar pavilion with unfettered public access. Exterior walkways connect the four thin towers, allowing in air and light and creating spaces for lively interaction between residents.

WIND-WIND by Hsiu Wei Chang. Residents linger in the two-story corridor with sky gardens.

VERTICAL STREET by Fanzheng Dong. Continuing the park in front of the project up the tall building brings outdoor space with fresh air and light up into the vertical street.

CROSSOVER by D'Genaro Pulido.

Interior, CROSSOVER by D'Genaro Pulido.

INFRASTUCTURE_ICON by Ben Golze.

SPATIAL ASCENT by Kwangmin Ryu uses three different kinds of architectural gestures: Linkage of green spaces from bottom to top, interaction with negative spaces, and the "tree branch" shape of the structural facade.

LIGHT CARVING by Stephen Stewart. Vertical gardens on the south façade create a green connection from the park throughout the building.

CROSSOVER by Andy Rastetter. Water and green spaces are woven through the site to create a loosely figured edge condition between Mission Rock Square and the San Francisco Bay.

Interior, CROSSOVER by Andy Rastetter

SLOW RISE by Julie Chau. Occupying an internal ramp, which shifts in spatial condition, creates moments for interaction between inhabitants and becomes an event in itself.

Models, renderings, student presentations, and engaged discussion filled the evening @StorefrontLab's first City Making Salon.

Models at the StoreFrontLab.org gallery space.